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Writing from the Heart

In this space, WestBow Press publishes articles written by our authors in which they share some aspect of their self-publishing journey. The following blog is from Stephanie Murphy. Stephanie is a licensed marriage and family therapist in private practice in Jacksonville, Florida.  She is the author of “Strong and Courageous: Encouragement for Families Touched by Autism,” and “Faith, Hope, Courage and New Beginnings.”  She is actively involved with her husband in his life’s work as a missionary to young people in Europe and Costa Rica. For more information on the author visit her website, blog site and Facebook page. To begin your self-publishing journey, get a free WestBow Press publishing guide today. 

I felt God’s leading to write both of my books—from my heart.  Although many of the articles I had written over the years had been published in various Christian magazines, including LifeWay’s MatureLiving and ParentLife, this was different.  There was a whole new level of vulnerability attached to writing a book.

As a new author, I wasn’t completely clear on what I was doing as I took the first step.  I began writing—every day.  The more I wrote, the easier the words flowed as I tapped into a creativity I had always known was there but hadn’t completely harnessed.  Now, with the discipline of daily writing, I was able to find a canvas for the expression of that creativity.

Both of my books were birthed out of adversity.  My first book, Strong and Courageous: Encouragement for Families Touched by Autism, was written to encourage families who are raising a special needs child.  Having walked the journey with my own daughter, son-in-law, and grandson, I was able to share not only from my professional experience but also from the heart of a grandmother who deeply loves her little grandson who has autism.

I began writing my second book, Faith, Hope, Courage and New Beginnings, after I lost my husband to death several years ago.  I continued writing as I walked through that painful loss to a place of healing and new beginnings.  As a professional marriage and family therapist, I had counseled numerous individuals over the years who were dealing with loss and grief.  I found it to be true that you cannot fully relate until you have experienced your own deep personal loss.

Although it comes with the price of feeling quite vulnerable at times, I am glad God has called me to write from my heart.  I wouldn’t have it any other way!  I am thankful for my experiences with WestBow Press as they were able to turn each of my writings into a beautiful and meaningful finished product.  Their assistance provided the structure I needed to turn this into a manageable process, with step-by-step professional guidance for what could have otherwise been an overwhelming undertaking.

I recently had a woman tell me she had read my book over and over, trying to figure out how I had written it because she also wanted to write a book.  My advice to her was, “Just start writing—from your heart!”

WestBow Press authors who’d like to share a 350-600 word experience related to the self-publishing of their books are invited to do so through the Blog Guidelines Page. WestBow Press reserves the right to edit stories for content, grammar, punctuation, and length.

 


Point of View: Second Person

Welcome back! We hope that your self-publishing journey has been progressing smoothly. In a previous post, we began talking about point of view, also known as “person.” We began by discussing first person, identifiable by the use of the pronouns “I” or “we:”

I stepped to the side of the door and pulled my gun from its holster.

I waited in the car an hour before Lucas finally arrived home.

Today, we’ll talk about second person. Even seasoned writers occasionally trip over this one, usually because it simply isn’t used very often in fiction. Second person, which uses the pronoun “you” in both the singular and plural forms, is appropriate when the writer is addressing the reader.

If you think about it, you’ll find that you use it all the time – in emails, instructions, advice, and speeches. You leave a note to your son on the refrigerator: “There’s meatloaf in the oven, you can heat it up when you get hungry.” What about that email to your sister? “You should really think about it before you quit your job, especially in this economy.”

In both sentences, the writer is talking to the reader, almost like an actor looking directly at the camera to deliver his lines.

So why isn’t it used in fiction? Because of the actor/camera example cited above. There simply aren’t many instances when the narrator of a story addresses the reader directly. As with most things in life, there are exceptions, though. Take Jay McInerney’s Bright Lights, Big City:

Eventually you ascend the stairs to the street. You think of Plato’s pilgrims climbing out of the cave, from the shadow world of appearances toward things as they really are, and you wonder if it is possible to change in this life. Being with a philosopher makes you think.

Is McInerney addressing the reader directly, implying that it’s the reader’s story? No; in this case, he’s using second person to create a feeling of detachment in the narrator. Essentially, this is a first person story being told in second person, with the narrator “stepping outside himself” and viewing his life as an observer.

As mentioned above, the second person also has a plural form, but the pronoun “you” is used for both.

WestBow Press authors who’d like to share a 350-600 word experience related to the self-publishing of their books are invited to do so through the Blog Guidelines Page. WestBow Press reserves the right to edit stories for content, grammar, punctuation, and length.


Writing in First Person Point of View

Points of View

Today we’re going to begin discussing point of view: WHO is telling your story? What information does that narrator have access to? It sounds simple, but many are the writers who have made point of view mistakes, or who aren’t completely sure about that pesky “second person.”

Basically, there are three points of view, called (appropriately enough) “first person,” “second person,” and “third person.” Today we’ll focus on first person because, well, it’s called “first.” It’s also the point of view that writers are most comfortable with.

First person is distinguishable by the use of the pronouns “I” or “we.” The narrator is a participant in the story, and is recalling events that he or she experienced personally.

I lifted the sheet and examined the body.

I waited in the car almost an hour until she arrived home.

Does that mean that the narrator has to be the main character? No; Dr. Watson can narrate a story, but Sherlock Holmes is still the main character.

Common Mistakes to Avoid

Please remember that when you use a first person point of view, the narrator only has access to information that the character would realistically have. For example:

I climbed the stairs to the second floor, walked down the hall to room 207, and knocked. Inside, Mary Ann, came to the foyer, paused a moment to fix her hair in the mirror, and opened the door. “Can I help you?” she asked.

So what’s wrong with this? Unless it’s a glass or screen door (or the narrator has X-ray vision), which should be obvious from the text, he has no way of knowing that Mary Ann fixed her hair before opening the door. On the other hand:

I climbed the stairs to the second floor, walked down the hall to room 207, and knocked. I could hear footsteps in the foyer. They paused, and then the door opened a moment later.

In this case, the narrator is using information that he realistically would have had by simply using his senses.

Home officeWhen to Use First Person

First person is, for obvious reasons, almost standard for autobiographies. After all, the narrator is telling her own story, the things that she experienced firsthand.

The pronoun “I” indicates that first person singular is being used, but there is also a plural form (“we”). So when might it be used? It’s common in self-help books, for example, when the author is including himself with the readers:

We continually seek happiness through accumulation of wealth and possessions, not realizing that it’s often the quest for more possessions that is making us miserable in the first place.

It should be mentioned that some writers switch between first and third person points of view in the same book, or sometimes remain in first person but switch narrators. If you use this device, you should always make it obvious to the reader that this has occurred (by starting a new chapter or speaking in a different “voice,” for example).

And that’s all that we have time for today! In future posts, we’ll discuss second and third person.

WestBow Press authors who’d like to share a 350-600 word experience related to the self-publishing of their books are invited to do so through the Blog Guidelines Page. WestBow Press reserves the right to edit stories for content, grammar, punctuation, and length.


Tips for Beating Writer’s Block, Part Four

We hope this post finds you proceeding smoothly along the self-publishing road!

If, however, you’ve been hitting a few bumps (or roadblocks!) lately, you’ve come to the right place. Today we present our fourth batch of suggestions for staying the course when the obstacles seem insurmountable, and when writer’s block has you thinking of a career change.

Start in the middle of your project.

In our first installment, we suggested skipping over a problem section of your story and returning to it later. Well, this suggestion can be put to use in other ways, too. Do you know where your characters should end up in Act Two but just don’t know how to get them there?

To borrow a Star Wars reference, do you know what to do once everyone boards the Millennium Falcon, but just don’t know how to get them to Mos Eisley?

Then put Act One aside for now! Start in the middle and proceed from there. You can always backtrack later, and you might even find that the middle was a better place to begin your story! Or, events that happen later in the story may suggest seeds that you should have planted earlier or payoffs for subplots that you will need to introduce in the beginning.

Take a break.

In most cases, we believe in having a set writing schedule and sticking to it. On the other hand, it’s better to change your writing time for the day than to simply not write at all. Writer’s block can be a stressful thing, and exercise is one of the best remedies for stress.

So get out from behind the computer and head for the gym, walking trail, tennis court, or pool. A little physical activity may be all you need to get some distance from your writing project and see it with a fresh set of eyes when you return. And hey, it never hurts to get more exercise!

[Side note: you should try to incorporate exercise into your schedule anyway. Writing, while mentally stimulating, isn’t the most physical activity, and a daily dose of exercise will help keep your body and mind performing at their best.]

WestBow Press authors who’d like to share a 350-600 word experience related to the self-publishing of their books are invited to do so through the Blog Guidelines Page. WestBow Press reserves the right to edit stories for content, grammar, punctuation, and length.


Tips for Beating Writer’s Block, Part Three

So, you’re still staring at the monitor, fingers frozen over the keyboard? Never fear, we’ve got some new ideas and suggestions for breaking down the wall known as “writer’s block.”

Writer’s block can be like the common cold—the remedy that works for one person doesn’t always work for everyone, so you should experiment and find what’s best for you. Discard the rest, or keep it in the back of your mind to try another time.

Let’s get started with two new tips for today!

Change Projects

Director Wong Kar-Wai, the story goes, was having creative trouble with his epic adventure Ashes of Time (call it “director’s block”). His solution? He took a two month break from the film and shot another film, the classic Chungking Express, a movie completely different in genre and tone. He supposedly returned to Ashes of Time mentally refreshed and ready to proceed with the story.

The lesson for writers? Don’t be afraid to have more than one project “on the stove” at any given time, even if one’s on the back burner. When you’re feeling blocked, take a break and give your mind a change of scenery. You may find that after spending a few days with your other project, you’re ready to jump back into your primary story, refreshed and recharged.

Short stories, poetry, or flash fiction can be a great option, as they allow you to step away from your primary story and complete a totally separate work before returning to your “blocked” story.

Always Carry a Notebook

This is always a great tip for writers, regardless of the circumstances; after all, an idea that seems brilliant at the time can vanish like the morning mist when the distractions of daily life crowd it out of your mind. But how does it apply specifically to writer’s block? In reference to our last tip, if you want a “back burner” project, you’re going to need ideas for that project.

So the next time writer’s block visits you, take a moment to whip out the notebook, flip through the pages, and get started on that other great idea you had in the doctor’s office last month, even if “get started” simply means making an outline, character sketch, or a film treatment. Even if your story is temporarily blocked, it doesn’t mean you have to be also!

WestBow Press authors who’d like to share a 350-600 word experience related to the self-publishing of their books are invited to do so through the Blog Guidelines Page. WestBow Press reserves the right to edit stories for content, grammar, punctuation, and length.


Organizing a Book on Theology

In this space, WestBow Press publishes articles written by our authors in which they share some aspect of their self-publishing journey. The following blog is from Russell E. Gehrlein, author of Immanuel Labor—God’s Presence in Our Profession. For more information on the author visit his website and Facebook page. To begin your self-publishing journey, get a free WestBow Press publishing guide today.

In March 2015, I gave a two-hour presentation on the theology of work to a small group of local college students as part of an independent study for my master’s degree with Grand Rapids Theological Seminary. Three years later, this slideshow had become a 282-page book. This unique resource is a solid introduction to this critical subject so that the average Christian worker can understand how they can experience God’s presence at work every day.

I imagine there are other biblical scholars or theologians who have a concept they are passionate to share with others to aid them in their own spiritual growth. Let me share a few lessons that I learned along the way that kept me focused on the task and helped me succeed.

Getting the Project Moving in the Right Direction

My wife said I should write a book on this subject. Six months after my presentation, I created a tentative chapter outline. I put it on the back burner until July 2016, when I began to copy my notes and quotes from my presentation, and pasted them into the appropriate chapter.

I knew I needed to wrestle with this topic a bit further to fill in the gaps in my understanding. In January 2016, I selected a dozen more books to read and concluded my research in June 2017. At the same time, I began to write a series of articles about work on my blog, Reflections on Theological Topics of Interest. Twenty of these articles were adapted and expanded from my notes, and thirty were new. I took these original articles and put them in the appropriate place in my book. The page count grew. I somehow found the courage to send some of these articles to a few faith and work organizations. Two of them, the LeTourneau Center for Faith & Work, and the Institute for Faith, Work & Economics took a chance on me and posted a dozen articles on their websites.

Consolidating my Research

The best thing I can recommend to other writers of theology is to develop and follow a detailed plan with realistic milestones. The plan I put down kept me on track, allowing me to start on May 1, 2017, expand my rough collection of organized notes and articles, and have my first draft completed by Labor Day (an appropriate date for a book on the theology of work).

I spent five weeks taking my list of 300 Bible verses I created for my independent study, identify where they belonged, and inserting a short summary or reference in each chapter. I chose ten to twenty key of those Scriptures, and did a little more study in commentaries to augment my own observations. I compiled a Scripture index, which would be a helpful tool for those who wanted to study further. I took seven more weeks to page through the thirty books I had read on this subject and typed up quotes that were especially inspirational or reinforced my own views. I selected over three hundred quotes from both classic and modern writers, typed them in one long document, placed them in a logical spot in my book, and created footnotes. I made an effort to tie this perspective on work to the other aspects of systematic theology. I found illustrations to help my readers see how to apply these truths. I reflected on my own personal career journey, added some experiences from family and friends, and shared them throughout.

It was a long and difficult road, but it was one I was glad that I took.

WestBow Press authors who’d like to share a 350-600 word experience related to the self-publishing of their books are invited to do so through the Blog Guidelines Page. WestBow Press reserves the right to edit stories for content, grammar, punctuation, and length.


Self-Publishing Lessons I Learned

In this space, WestBow Press publishes articles written by our authors in which they share some aspect of their self-publishing journey. The following blog is from Jack Manilla, author of “Secrets of the Pink House For more information on the author visit his website and Facebook. To begin your self-publishing journey, get a free WestBow Press publishing guide today.

Self-Publishing Newbie

When it comes to running a successful business, I know what it takes. I have worked at many well-established companies including two Fortune 500 companies. But when it came time to publish my personal story in “Secrets Of The Pink House,” I didn’t know what that entailed. At first, I thought getting my book published would be a quick process, taking just a few months to set up the presses; but the truth is, writing and then getting your book published is a very long journey. If you want it done right, it requires patience and expertise.

The publishing team at WestBow are some of the best at what they do. We went through a very detailed process to ensure we were developing a high-quality book, and they were with me every step of the way.  The experience taught me that those considering publishing a book, especially their own personal story, should take into consideration the time and effort it will take to complete. It can be rather daunting, so they should factor that into their decision to publish or not.

Writing a Book is Like Running a Business

“Secrets Of The Pink House,” was indeed a labor of love. After being encouraged for many years to turn my story into a book, and share the lessons I learned while going through some of the roughest patches of my life, I decided to accept the challenge of putting my experiences down on paper.

Writing a book is like running a business; you have to spend serious time working on it every day for it to be successful. Not just a few minutes here and there, you have to invest at least one to four hours of time daily to make it successful and to wind up with a finished product exactly as you envision it. As with everything you do, the effort you invest determines the quality of your finished product.  If writing is not something you are truly passionate about, and you consider it more of a hobby, then taking up the challenge to write a book may not be for you.

Another thing I learned while on this journey was the importance of knowing yourself.  It is critical to stay authentic when writing your story. No one knows you or your story better than you.

Don’t Hesitate to Ask for Help

Lastly, just like when you were in school, don’t hesitate to ask for help. Reach out to your publisher, family and friends, people you trust and invite them to provide you with their opinion and feedback or bounce ideas off of them. They may help you remember a key piece of information or paint a better perspective of a moment or event.

Remember, you may be an expert on your life’s journey, but there are great benefits to bringing in others and learning from their experience like WestBow, to help you achieve the goals you hope to reach when publishing your book.

At the end of the day, I hope that those who pick up a copy of my book learn that through faith, trust and hard work, they are able to succeed in whatever path God places in front of them, and that might just include writing their own story down to share with the world.

WestBow Press authors who’d like to share a 350-600 word experience related to the self-publishing of their books are invited to do so through the Blog Guidelines Page. WestBow Press reserves the right to edit stories for content, grammar, punctuation, and length.


Tips for Beating Writer’s Block, Part Two

Welcome back to another installment of suggestions for beating writer’s block! Every self-published author has experienced it, or will someday. How crippling it becomes to your writing, though, depends on how you view it—and how you handle it.

Of course, what works for one writer won’t necessarily work for another, so these tips are like a buffet: try a bunch of things, and then come back for seconds on the things you liked!

In our first post, we discussed keeping things in perspective, having reasonable standards, and skipping the troublesome parts of your story for the sake of progressing forward. Let’s continue with today’s new set of tips!

Door 2Don’t wait to be “inspired.”

We’ve said this a hundred times so this will make it one hundred and one: write every day! No other piece of writing advice is so universal, so common to successful writers everywhere. You’ve worked other jobs before, right? And did you ever experience “waiter’s block?” “Carpenter’s block?” “Accountant’s block?”

To some extent, you have to treat your writing like any other job that you’re expected to do. Some days you’ll be more “in the zone” than others, but you should always show up, ready to do the work. One of the best things about writing is the ability to rewrite! If you wait for the muse to pull you by the ear to your desk, you could find yourself waiting a long time.

Set a schedule for yourself.

This is tied closely to the last tip above. Again, at that other job you had, you probably had a schedule, right? Well, have one for your writing too! One of the benefits of a writing career is the ability to set your own schedule, not necessarily to not have a schedule at all. Treat your writing time as a sacred block of time, and protect it.

Singer/songwriter Billy Joel once commented on all the songs that he never would have written if he hadn’t shown up at the piano with nothing particular in mind, but ready to do the work. Treat your writing the same way: show up, ready to do the work.

Read!

When you’re not writing, make sure you set aside time for reading! Read your chosen genre and outside it, fiction and nonfiction, prose and poetry. Not only will it make you a better writer, it can also plant the seed for your next story.

And don’t forget newspapers and magazines either, online print. Newspapers and magazines present situations and events; create characters, place them in those events, and ta-da! You have a story!

– WBP –

WestBow Press authors who’d like to share a 350-600 word experience related to the self-publishing of their books are invited to do so through the Blog Guidelines Page. WestBow Press reserves the right to edit stories for content, grammar, punctuation, and length


Dream Stealers

In this space, WestBow Press publishes articles written by our authors in which they share some aspect of their self-publishing journeys. The following blog is from Larry D Horton, author of “The Final Journey”. To learn more about this author visit his website or Twitter. To begin your self-publishing journey, get a free WestBow Press publishing guide today!

Dream Stealers

The call to follow one’s writing dream often takes a path strewn with potholes, detours, delays, spits and sputters. Others may throw road blocks along your path that hinder you from fulfilling your dream. An author (Bear Grylls), that I admire, calls those others dream stealers. Each of us, if we reflect back through our lives, can identify individuals, events, circumstances, and maybe our own fears, that have prevented us from fulfilling our writing dream.

We cannot let those dream stealers determine whether we fulfill our personal dream or a more profound call on our lives from the Lord. As a writer, you will experience rejection from publishing houses, family and friends who will try to protect you from disappointment out of their love for you, or possibly your own self-doubts. All are dream stealers.

So how do we overcome them?

Overcoming those dream stealers is easy to write about. There are certain basic skills and disciplines that, when used, can help you overcome the hindrances that you confront. Discipline, self-belief, surrounding yourself with affirming individuals, are just a few of the secrets to eventual success. But we have to be honest and realistic. Doing all of these is much harder in real life than it is to write them down in this paragraph. Life is hard. There are no guarantees that success will be your experience. At the same time, there are no guarantees that you will fail.

Writing is truly a calling from our Lord. That is the one thing that we, as Christians, have that makes the final difference in whether or not we overcome our writing dream stealers. The strength, common sense, discipline, and wisdom to see our dream fulfilled are all ultimately gifts given to us from our Lord. And when we stand in the center of the Lord’s will as writers we will have the peace that surpasses all comprehension, a peace that guides and strengthens us regardless of what dream stealers we run into on our writing journey.

Believe in Your Dreams

Your dream may be something new. For others, it may have existed for decades. You may have already experienced dream stealers. Others of you may have given up on your dream many years ago because you were unable to overcome a dream stealer. It is my prayer, whether you are dreaming a new dream or one that has been with you all your life, that you will not surrender to the dream stealers. Keep believing in your dream. Never give in to the temptation to abandon that dream. Give your dream back to the Lord who first gave it to you and ask that He show you the path that you should follow to make your dream live.

Follow your heart, your dream, and the guidance of the Holy Spirit. Then hold on for the ride of your life.

– WBP –

WestBow Press authors who’d like to share a 350-600 word experience related to the self-publishing of their books are invited to do so by sending a message through the WestBow Press Facebook page and follow the WestBow Press Twitter account @WestBowPress. WestBow Press reserves the right to edit stories for content, grammar, punctuation, and length


Tips for Beating Writer’s Block, Part One

Today we’d like to begin discussing something that affects all writers, self-published or otherwise. Yeah, you know what it is already: writer’s block.

Why are there so many articles on writer’s block? Probably because writer’s block is to authors what a pulled muscle is to an athlete: one of the common denominators of the trade, something every participant can identify with. And like that pulled muscle, it’s one of the most frustrating.

Remember what writer’s block is, and isn’t.

In search of inspiration.

“Writer’s block.” It sounds so impenetrable, doesn’t it? And that’s part of the problem. But it’s not a wall or a force field or a dead-end street. It’s just a temporary inability for a writer to decide on the best direction for their story. Realize that there IS a best direction; you just haven’t figured it out yet. Relax!

Remember, you’re in good company!

Charles Dickens has had it. Ditto for Stephen King, John Grisham, J. K. Rowling, Tom Clancy, Stephanie Meyer, and James Patterson. You name the author, and it’s guaranteed that (s)he has stared at the monitor, blank sheet of paper, or piece of parchment and thought, “I have no idea what to write.”

And you know what? They went on to write classics and bestsellers. A problem doesn’t seem so insurmountable when you see other people solve it, does it? Well, every writer in the history of the craft has solved it; you will too.

Lower your standards.

Poet William Stafford perhaps said it best: “There’s no such thing as writer’s block for writers whose standards are low enough.” He wasn’t promoting substandard writing, of course. The point is, it’s common for writers to set unreasonably high standards that aren’t achievable on a consistent basis. Remember, a lot of your story is going to manifest itself in the rewrite, not the first draft. The important thing is to just keep moving forward; you can always come back and fix that “clunky” scene later!

Just skip it!

So you’ve already written “A,” “B,” and “C,” and you have “F” and “G” plotted out. But you’re stuck on “D” and “E,” and have no idea what to do with them. Sure, you can pound your head on the desk until you figure it out, or you can just skip ahead for now! Jump to the next place in your story where you’re on “sure footing,” and start writing from there. You can always figure out the gaps later–and you will!

– WBP –

WestBow Press authors who’d like to share a 350-600 word experience related to the self-publishing of their books are invited to do so through the Blog Guidelines Page. WestBow Press reserves the right to edit stories for content, grammar, punctuation, and length


Writing Advice from Famous Authors

Regan Platt is an offline marketing intern at Author Solutions, the world leader in supported self-publishing. She is currently a senior at Indiana University where she studies English. Regan is in Indiana University’s Liberal Arts Management Program, an honors level interdisciplinary program that incorporates Kelley School of Business courses with a liberal arts education. 

Don’t stop reading.Don't stop reading.

William Faulkner: “Read, read, read. Read everything — trash, classics, good and bad, and see how they do it. Just like a carpenter who works as an apprentice and studies the master. Read! You’ll absorb it. Then write. If it’s good, you’ll find out. If it’s not, throw it out of the window.”

Meaning: Faulkner emphasizes the importance of immersion. If you constantly surround yourself with writing, then you can start to observe both valuable techniques and common pitfalls. As you put to practice what you’ve observed, your own writing will become all the better for it.

Write the book you can’t find.

Toni Morrison: “If there’s a book that you want to read, but it hasn’t been written yet, then you must write it.”               

Meaning: This quote can be read as a call to arms for dreamers and “creatives.” The world would have so much less to read and dream if those with great stories never shared them.

Follow your instincts.

Saul Bellow: “You never have to change anything you got up in the middle of the night to write.”                                    

Meaning: Bellow comforts and encourages fellow writers who work in bursts of passion. Inspiration may come at the strangest and least convenient of times, yet when the muse calls it is best to answer.

Beware the predictable.Robert Frost Quote

Robert Frost: “No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader. No surprise in the writer, no surprise in the reader.”

Meaning: Frost suggests that strong writing occasionally necessitates a stream-of-consciousness technique that leaves only feelings and ideas. This emotional work results in literary moments of ingenuity.

Show, don’t tell.

Anton Chekhov: “Don’t tell me the moon is shining; show me the glint of light on broken glass.”

Meaning: Our final quote by Chekhov reverberates the traditional writing advice “show, don’t tell.”  Engaging writing leaves a reader to do some of the “visualizing” work themselves. Rather than dully listing the circumstances, great writing will reveal what’s happening in an innovative way.

– WBP –

WestBow Press authors who’d like to share a 350-600 word experience related to the self-publishing of their books are invited to do so by sending a message through the WestBow Press Facebook page and follow the WestBow Press Twitter account @WestBowPress. WestBow Press reserves the right to edit stories for content, grammar, punctuation, and length. 


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