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Writing Tip & Prompt: Your Favorite Scene

Writing Tip & PromptOn Fridays, we like to share writing tips and tricks with our readers. We hope this section will encourage and inspire you to continually improve as a writer.

Writing Tip – Your Favorite Scene

When developing a story, there is usually a line or scene that particularly strikes you. Develop this element first. Trying to write toward this exciting tidbit may only bore you and burn unnecessary fuel. Set aside time to thoroughly look at the most encouraging sentence and element. Until this element runs its course and you understand its place within the whole of your work, it will surely bother you as you’re writing other sections.

Writing Prompt – Father’s Day

Father, Dad, Daddy, Pops, Old Man – just a few of the names we might call our dads. Our dads are a compilation of our best friend, our hero, Mr. Fix-it and of course, our dad. This Sunday is Father’s Day, and what better way to celebrate your dad than by using your gift as a writer. Think back to your favorite memory of your father. Was it building a sandcastle with him on vacation? Or maybe playing ball with him in your yard? Whatever the memory, write a short story about it, include as many details as you remember. Let your dad understand how important that memory is to you through your writing.


Writing Tip & Prompt: Recognize Your Story’s Roots

Writing Tip & PromptOn Fridays, we like to share writing tips and tricks with our readers. We hope this section will encourage and inspire you to continually improve as a writer.

Writing Tip – Recognize Your Story’s Roots

Underneath all of the ideas and storytelling is the single purpose for sharing your story. Understanding the foundation and underlining meaning offers a direction to your writing and a deeper emotional connection with your readers.  Are your readers able to understand your story’s roots from your writing? If not, edit your story or add to it so that readers can better connect with your story.

Writing Prompt – Dreams

Dreams are our subconscious imagination working overboard — mindful stories combining current emotions, recent thoughts, and hopeful desires. Think of your latest dream. What was your subconscious trying to tell you? Write out the details you can remember and then finish the story.


Writing Tip & Prompt: Questions

Writing Tip & PromptOn Fridays, we like to share writing tips and tricks with our readers. We hope this section will encourage and inspire you to continually improve as a writer.

Writing Tip – Questions

When writing a book, it is inevitable that your manuscript will include questions. Sometimes the question is part of the dialogue, and sometimes it is a question for the reader to think about. Writing questions that begin a sentence, or are part of a dialogue are easy, but have you ever asked a question within your sentence? For example: The question is, Who is the protagonist of the story? Notice the w in “Who” is capitalized.  You always capitalize an independent question within a sentence.

Writing Prompt – Clear mind

What does a blank or clear mind do?  Look up at a clear sky, or find the blankest wall where you are (it can be just part of a wall, if need be) and stare at it for 5 to 10 uninterrupted minutes.  Write about the thoughts that went through your head while you stared. What tips do you have for helping writers clear their mind?


Writing Tip & Prompt: Creating Your Title

Writing Tip & PromptOn Fridays, we like to share writing tips and tricks with our readers. We hope this section will encourage and inspire you to continually improve as a writer.

Writing Tip – Creating Your Title

When titling a story or poem, there are some basic principles that might help. First, try to combine verbs and nouns. For example, the title “The Journey Home” might draw more readers under the title “Journeying Home.” Furthermore, avoid vague or sweeping titles like “A Hard Life” or “Dreamer’s Paradise.” Contemporary audiences respond better to titles that actively invoke images that can be viewed as metaphors for larger themes, such as “Crosswords for Lover.” Of course, every rule has its exception, so always listen to your creative instincts when titling your pieces.

Writing Prompt – Start with the Title

Sometimes, the title of your next story or poem will suddenly pop into your head, and you’ll still have no idea how to begin the piece. Instead of forgetting about them, keep a running list of these titles in a notebook. When you have time, pick one at random and free write for an hour, using the chosen title as a springboard. What you write my need a different title in the end, but the original title might trigger the creative impulse you need to begin a completely new writing venture.


Writing Tip & Prompt: Conversations

Writing Tip - ConversationOn Fridays, we like to share writing tips and tricks with our readers. We hope this section will encourage and inspire you to continually improve as a writer.

Writing Tip – Conversations

We write our stories in statements which typically transcends into dialogue between characters. Too many statements within your dialogue may leave your conversation flat on its page. Try adding questions mixed within the dialogue to perk up the flow. True conversation is full of questions and tag questions (you know?) as a tool for inviting a response. A mix of commands, interjections and questions will help keep your dialogue flowing and the pages rolling.

Writing Prompt – Plot Momentum

Momentum within a narrative is developed through the urge to find out what has happened in the past and discover what will happen next. By slowly unfolding the story for readers, the writer creates a lean towards what may come. As a reader, we develop conclusions for each character and the story’s events. If you are in the middle of reading a book, place it aside and imagine the remaining pages do not exist. Consider all possibilities for your characters … If A does this, B will do that, which will affect C in this way. But if B doesn’t then maybe D will do this. Write a short piece that follows one of these avenues, and see how the direction you choose enhances the momentum of your story.


Writing Tip & Prompt: Homophones

On Fridays, we like to share writing tips and tricks with our readers. We hope this section will encourage and inspire you to continually improve as a writer.

Writing Tip – Homophones

There, their and they’re. Your and you’re. When and win. Homophones are words with the same sound but different meanings, and there are several of them in the English language.  As a writer, you need to be extra careful to make sure you are using the correct form of the word.  One of the most commonly misused homophones is your and you’re. ‘Your’ is a possessive determiner, while ‘you’re’ is a contraction of you are. Ex: You’re at war. It is your turn to roll.  By learning the differences in spelling and meaning of the homophones in the English language, you can prevent yourself from making embarrassing mistakes in your writing.

Writing Prompt – Mothers

On Mother’s Day, we celebrate mothers, motherhood and the influence of mothers in society. Mothers want the best for their children and work hard to be the best mother they can be. Have you told your mother how much you appreciate her and everything she has done for you lately? This year, show your mother your appreciation by using your talent and passion to write her a poem.


Writing Tip & Prompt: Your Writing Process

Writing Tip & PromptOn Fridays, we like to share writing tips and tricks with our readers. We hope this section will encourage and inspire you to continually improve as a writer.

Writing Tip – Your Writing Process

Play around with your writing process. Change the font size so the words are larger in front of your eyes. Maybe use a different font to show what emotions are in the scene you are depicting. In the middle of a piece, start a new topic on a fresh sheet of paper to get that clean, fresh-start feeling. Take time when you are finished with your writing session to examine your choice of words, font and size. Each of these factors will offer a sense of direction for where your story is heading.

Writing Prompt – Surroundings

Take a look around and take in all of your surroundings. Make sure to focus on one thing, a building, a tree, the scenery, anything. Write a paragraph or two describing what you see in full detail and an additional paragraph explaining the history of what you see.


Writing Tip & Prompt: Visualizing Characters

Writing Prompt - InjuryOn Fridays, we like to share writing tips and tricks with our readers. We hope this section will encourage and inspire you to continually improve as a writer.

Writing Tip – Visualizing Characters

Picture your character before you start writing about them. Sometimes writers have a character in mind, but they have a hard time giving him or her definition. Don’t be afraid to draw your characters, or even borrow ideas from a photograph. Having an image in front of you can definitely make defining the physical features and descriptions of your character easier.

Writing Prompt – Injury

Think about the last time you were injured. Was it a minor injury, or did you break a limb? Then, write a story or poem about how your life changed and how you managed life while you were healing. What interesting insights or revelations came out of your healing process?


Writing Tip & Prompt: Read Reviews

Writing Tip and PromptOn Fridays, we like to share writing tips and tricks with our readers. We hope this section will encourage and inspire you to continually improve as a writer.

Writing Tip – Read Reviews

When writing your book, make sure to read the reviews of books of the same genre, or with a similar story line. You want to see what the readers and critics have to say about these books. Don’t fall into the same traps the books with bad reviews did. Instead, learn from their mistakes and shape your manuscript into a publication worthy of rave reviews.

Writing Prompt – Endings

Remember, not all stories have resolutions. Think about a story with a conflict where the characters simply exist within the tension. Perhaps it is an archeological search for some relic, or maybe a neighborly feud that has gone on for years. Now, write a story or poem that attempts to emulate this kind conflict, without reaching for a clean, fair or ironic resolution.


Writing Tip & Prompt: Dialogue

Writing Tip & PromptOn Fridays, we like to share writing tips and tricks with our readers. We hope this section will encourage and inspire you to continually improve as a writer.

Writing Tip – Dialogue

You want the dialogue in your book to flow. Try writing a scene in only dialogue. Try not to over think things, and let your words flow. Allow your character to solely set the movement of your scene. When you are finished, review your text and figure out what the scene was really about. By playing with dialogue, you’ll discover undercurrents for your scene that weren’t obvious before.

Writing Prompt – Character Development

Pick a story you like and know well. Take a look at the main character and write a paragraph describing this character at the start of the story: attitudes, beliefs, behaviors, etc. Now write a paragraph describing that character at the end. Do you see significant differences? Did the character stay steady or did change occur? How would you describe the emotional curve?


Writing Tip & Prompt: Change Your Scenery

Writing Tip and PromptOn Fridays, we like to share writing tips and tricks with our readers. We hope this section will encourage and inspire you to continually improve as a writer.

Writing Tip – Change Your Scenery

Dust off that map and take a look at the number of places you can travel within an hour of home. Go for a day trip. Sit and write someplace new. This change of scenery brings inspiration, motivation, and a new eye for your surroundings and all of its little details.

Writing Prompt – Character Voice

Who is easier to pen — the optimistic or the pessimistic voice?  Write a ‘poem for two voices’ where an optimist and a pessimist share their views about a single topic.


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