Writing in First Person Point of View

Points of View

Today we’re going to begin discussing point of view: WHO is telling your story? What information does that narrator have access to? It sounds simple, but many are the writers who have made point of view mistakes, or who aren’t completely sure about that pesky “second person.”

Basically, there are three points of view, called (appropriately enough) “first person,” “second person,” and “third person.” Today we’ll focus on first person because, well, it’s called “first.” It’s also the point of view that writers are most comfortable with.

First person is distinguishable by the use of the pronouns “I” or “we.” The narrator is a participant in the story, and is recalling events that he or she experienced personally.

I lifted the sheet and examined the body.

I waited in the car almost an hour until she arrived home.

Does that mean that the narrator has to be the main character? No; Dr. Watson can narrate a story, but Sherlock Holmes is still the main character.

Common Mistakes to Avoid

Please remember that when you use a first person point of view, the narrator only has access to information that the character would realistically have. For example:

I climbed the stairs to the second floor, walked down the hall to room 207, and knocked. Inside, Mary Ann, came to the foyer, paused a moment to fix her hair in the mirror, and opened the door. “Can I help you?” she asked.

So what’s wrong with this? Unless it’s a glass or screen door (or the narrator has X-ray vision), which should be obvious from the text, he has no way of knowing that Mary Ann fixed her hair before opening the door. On the other hand:

I climbed the stairs to the second floor, walked down the hall to room 207, and knocked. I could hear footsteps in the foyer. They paused, and then the door opened a moment later.

In this case, the narrator is using information that he realistically would have had by simply using his senses.

Home officeWhen to Use First Person

First person is, for obvious reasons, almost standard for autobiographies. After all, the narrator is telling her own story, the things that she experienced firsthand.

The pronoun “I” indicates that first person singular is being used, but there is also a plural form (“we”). So when might it be used? It’s common in self-help books, for example, when the author is including himself with the readers:

We continually seek happiness through accumulation of wealth and possessions, not realizing that it’s often the quest for more possessions that is making us miserable in the first place.

It should be mentioned that some writers switch between first and third person points of view in the same book, or sometimes remain in first person but switch narrators. If you use this device, you should always make it obvious to the reader that this has occurred (by starting a new chapter or speaking in a different “voice,” for example).

And that’s all that we have time for today! In future posts, we’ll discuss second and third person.

WestBow Press authors who’d like to share a 350-600 word experience related to the self-publishing of their books are invited to do so through the Blog Guidelines Page. WestBow Press reserves the right to edit stories for content, grammar, punctuation, and length.


Tips for Beating Writer’s Block, Part Four

We hope this post finds you proceeding smoothly along the self-publishing road!

If, however, you’ve been hitting a few bumps (or roadblocks!) lately, you’ve come to the right place. Today we present our fourth batch of suggestions for staying the course when the obstacles seem insurmountable, and when writer’s block has you thinking of a career change.

Start in the middle of your project.

In our first installment, we suggested skipping over a problem section of your story and returning to it later. Well, this suggestion can be put to use in other ways, too. Do you know where your characters should end up in Act Two but just don’t know how to get them there?

To borrow a Star Wars reference, do you know what to do once everyone boards the Millennium Falcon, but just don’t know how to get them to Mos Eisley?

Then put Act One aside for now! Start in the middle and proceed from there. You can always backtrack later, and you might even find that the middle was a better place to begin your story! Or, events that happen later in the story may suggest seeds that you should have planted earlier or payoffs for subplots that you will need to introduce in the beginning.

Take a break.

In most cases, we believe in having a set writing schedule and sticking to it. On the other hand, it’s better to change your writing time for the day than to simply not write at all. Writer’s block can be a stressful thing, and exercise is one of the best remedies for stress.

So get out from behind the computer and head for the gym, walking trail, tennis court, or pool. A little physical activity may be all you need to get some distance from your writing project and see it with a fresh set of eyes when you return. And hey, it never hurts to get more exercise!

[Side note: you should try to incorporate exercise into your schedule anyway. Writing, while mentally stimulating, isn’t the most physical activity, and a daily dose of exercise will help keep your body and mind performing at their best.]

WestBow Press authors who’d like to share a 350-600 word experience related to the self-publishing of their books are invited to do so through the Blog Guidelines Page. WestBow Press reserves the right to edit stories for content, grammar, punctuation, and length.


Tips for Beating Writer’s Block, Part Three

So, you’re still staring at the monitor, fingers frozen over the keyboard? Never fear, we’ve got some new ideas and suggestions for breaking down the wall known as “writer’s block.”

Writer’s block can be like the common cold—the remedy that works for one person doesn’t always work for everyone, so you should experiment and find what’s best for you. Discard the rest, or keep it in the back of your mind to try another time.

Let’s get started with two new tips for today!

Change Projects

Director Wong Kar-Wai, the story goes, was having creative trouble with his epic adventure Ashes of Time (call it “director’s block”). His solution? He took a two month break from the film and shot another film, the classic Chungking Express, a movie completely different in genre and tone. He supposedly returned to Ashes of Time mentally refreshed and ready to proceed with the story.

The lesson for writers? Don’t be afraid to have more than one project “on the stove” at any given time, even if one’s on the back burner. When you’re feeling blocked, take a break and give your mind a change of scenery. You may find that after spending a few days with your other project, you’re ready to jump back into your primary story, refreshed and recharged.

Short stories, poetry, or flash fiction can be a great option, as they allow you to step away from your primary story and complete a totally separate work before returning to your “blocked” story.

Always Carry a Notebook

This is always a great tip for writers, regardless of the circumstances; after all, an idea that seems brilliant at the time can vanish like the morning mist when the distractions of daily life crowd it out of your mind. But how does it apply specifically to writer’s block? In reference to our last tip, if you want a “back burner” project, you’re going to need ideas for that project.

So the next time writer’s block visits you, take a moment to whip out the notebook, flip through the pages, and get started on that other great idea you had in the doctor’s office last month, even if “get started” simply means making an outline, character sketch, or a film treatment. Even if your story is temporarily blocked, it doesn’t mean you have to be also!

WestBow Press authors who’d like to share a 350-600 word experience related to the self-publishing of their books are invited to do so through the Blog Guidelines Page. WestBow Press reserves the right to edit stories for content, grammar, punctuation, and length.


My Self-Publishing Journey

In this space, WestBow Press publishes articles written by our authors in which they share some aspect of their self-publishing journey. The following blog is from Donna Renay Patrick, author of “It’s in Your Praise!” and “At All Times” For more information on the author visit her website, Twitter and Facebook page. To begin your self-publishing journey, get a free WestBow Press publishing guide today.

Traditional or Self-publishing?

When it became evident that I was about to write a BOOK (*yikes!*), I began my research into whether or not I would use a traditional publisher or if I would self-publish.  Of course, having never been an author before I had no idea there were so many options.   But there were MANY options on both sides, so I begin my information-gathering journey.  At the end of the day, I had two choices:  I could go with a traditional publisher who would handle the marketing and pay several thousands of dollars to publish it, or I could go with a self-publisher, pay an amount more in tune with my budget, and handle my own marketing.  When I did some in-depth research into Westbow Press, what impressed me most was their connection to Thomas Nelson Publishing.  I was familiar with Thomas Nelson because they have published Bibles, books, commentaries, and other church-related learning materials for centuries.  The other thing that impressed me was the number of packages they offered, depending on how extensive I wanted my reach to be.  I could publish a single format or multiple formats.

Selecting the Right Self-publisher

If you are considering, or have perhaps already begun your self-publishing journey, it is very important to select a self-publisher who “gets” you; in other words, they embrace your vision, and won’t water down your message.  This will take time and patience.  It will be a matter of asking the right questions.  Go with the wrong publisher and they may not allow you to tell your story the way you want it told because their vision is not aligned with yours.  I had no doubt Westbow Press would guard my vision because I knew their publishing pedigree.  I knew their connection to the Christian community.

When I was in corporate America, I had completed a Paralegal program and spent several years (more than I care to count) working in some of Dallas’ largest and most prestigious law firms.  I truly believe my writing skills were honed during those years drafting motions, briefs, and other court papers for my lawyer bosses.  Proper grammar, spelling, and context are extremely important when doing legal writing.  So when we got to the editing stage of my manuscript, I pretty much did the editing myself.  I was glad that I could take advantage of the editing services offered by Westbow, but while I did consider their suggestions, for the most part, I did my own editing.  Had I not spent those years learning to write, speak, and think like a lawyer, I would not have been able to do that.

Overcoming the Challenges

My biggest challenge being an author has been marketing my books; so I had to get creative.  I had no clue – it was truly a faith walk.  Westbow handled getting me on Amazon and Barnes & Noble, so I didn’t have to worry about that.  But I didn’t depend on them to sell my book.  I had a great support system in the church, and of course, my own church hosted a book signing for me.  After that, I kept my ears and eyes open for book signing opportunities.  As time went by I have learned much about having a marketing strategy, knowing your target audience, and being ready when people ask you what your book is about.

My self-publishing journey has been fun, informative, and a major blessing in my life.  It has certainly catapulted me to another level in ministry.  I’ve made new author-friends and taken advantage of networking and learning opportunities for authors.

WestBow Press authors who’d like to share a 350-600 word experience related to the self-publishing of their books are invited to do so through the Blog Guidelines Page. WestBow Press reserves the right to edit stories for content, grammar, punctuation, and length.


Organizing a Book on Theology

In this space, WestBow Press publishes articles written by our authors in which they share some aspect of their self-publishing journey. The following blog is from Russell E. Gehrlein, author of Immanuel Labor—God’s Presence in Our Profession. For more information on the author visit his website and Facebook page. To begin your self-publishing journey, get a free WestBow Press publishing guide today.

In March 2015, I gave a two-hour presentation on the theology of work to a small group of local college students as part of an independent study for my master’s degree with Grand Rapids Theological Seminary. Three years later, this slideshow had become a 282-page book. This unique resource is a solid introduction to this critical subject so that the average Christian worker can understand how they can experience God’s presence at work every day.

I imagine there are other biblical scholars or theologians who have a concept they are passionate to share with others to aid them in their own spiritual growth. Let me share a few lessons that I learned along the way that kept me focused on the task and helped me succeed.

Getting the Project Moving in the Right Direction

My wife said I should write a book on this subject. Six months after my presentation, I created a tentative chapter outline. I put it on the back burner until July 2016, when I began to copy my notes and quotes from my presentation, and pasted them into the appropriate chapter.

I knew I needed to wrestle with this topic a bit further to fill in the gaps in my understanding. In January 2016, I selected a dozen more books to read and concluded my research in June 2017. At the same time, I began to write a series of articles about work on my blog, Reflections on Theological Topics of Interest. Twenty of these articles were adapted and expanded from my notes, and thirty were new. I took these original articles and put them in the appropriate place in my book. The page count grew. I somehow found the courage to send some of these articles to a few faith and work organizations. Two of them, the LeTourneau Center for Faith & Work, and the Institute for Faith, Work & Economics took a chance on me and posted a dozen articles on their websites.

Consolidating my Research

The best thing I can recommend to other writers of theology is to develop and follow a detailed plan with realistic milestones. The plan I put down kept me on track, allowing me to start on May 1, 2017, expand my rough collection of organized notes and articles, and have my first draft completed by Labor Day (an appropriate date for a book on the theology of work).

I spent five weeks taking my list of 300 Bible verses I created for my independent study, identify where they belonged, and inserting a short summary or reference in each chapter. I chose ten to twenty key of those Scriptures, and did a little more study in commentaries to augment my own observations. I compiled a Scripture index, which would be a helpful tool for those who wanted to study further. I took seven more weeks to page through the thirty books I had read on this subject and typed up quotes that were especially inspirational or reinforced my own views. I selected over three hundred quotes from both classic and modern writers, typed them in one long document, placed them in a logical spot in my book, and created footnotes. I made an effort to tie this perspective on work to the other aspects of systematic theology. I found illustrations to help my readers see how to apply these truths. I reflected on my own personal career journey, added some experiences from family and friends, and shared them throughout.

It was a long and difficult road, but it was one I was glad that I took.

WestBow Press authors who’d like to share a 350-600 word experience related to the self-publishing of their books are invited to do so through the Blog Guidelines Page. WestBow Press reserves the right to edit stories for content, grammar, punctuation, and length.


At All Times

In this space, WestBow Press publishes articles written by our authors in which they share some aspect of their self-publishing journey. The following blog is from Donna Renay Patrick, author of “It’s in Your Praise!” and “At All Times” For more information on the author visit her website, Twitter and Facebook page. To begin your self-publishing journey, get a free WestBow Press publishing guide today.

Great is the Lord, and greatly to be praised; and his greatness is unsearchable. (Psalm 145:3)
I will bless the Lord at all times: his praise shall continually be in my mouth. (Psalm 34:1)

Never did I think I would be an author of a book about praise and worship. About 20 years ago, upon entering this ministry area, God lit a fire under me that is still burning. The more I knew the more I wanted to know. I had been a musician for most of my life, but God began to show me that there is so much more to praise and worship than just great music; He showed me in the Word of God why praise, worship, and music don’t always come in the same package. Neither praise nor worship is about a great song; they are about what is in your heart. You can sing beautifully, and still have a heart that is devoid of a relationship with Jesus Christ.

As we experience difficult situations in our lives we sometimes ask ourselves, “What reason do I have to keep praising God while I’m going through such a terrible time?” You have EVERY reason! Not only are you under divine mandate to praise Him, but God will always deserve our praise. It might take a change in perspective.

Praising God

My first book, At All Times, was birthed from the belief that no matter what we go through in life the praises of God are always in order. I wanted to change hearts and thought processes concerning praising God. In the chapter, God Has Given Us Weapons: Are You Using Yours? the point is made that one of the weapons we have against the enemy is our praise! In 2 Chronicles chapter 20 King Jehoshaphat and the nation of Judah praised God on their way to what they thought was a battlefield. Instead, what they found were the dead bodies of their enemies! Why? Because God moved in their praises and destroyed the enemy.

In the chapter, Praising God Ahead of Schedule, you will discover you don’t have to wait until God manifests the answer to your prayer. When you praise God BEFORE your prayer is answered it is an incredible act of faith! It says to God, “I trust You to handle this situation for me. Thank You, Jesus!” Psalm 138:8 speaks to us, “The Lord will perfect that which concerns me: your mercy, O Lord, endures forever. . .” That’s a good reason to praise Him ahead of schedule.

Self-Publishing with WestBow Press

My self-publishing experience was incredibly rewarding. I learned how important it is to choose a publisher who really understands your vision, and will not water down your message. The assistance and mentoring I received from Westbow Press were invaluable. The consultant assigned to me every step of the process was professional, prompt in responding to my questions, and patient during the editing process. My biggest challenge as a self-published author is marketing. Along the way, I have met people more knowledgeable than I am, and have certainly heeded their wisdom. Early on, I was told that having a book is your business card to get you into various places. I have since learned that my book is not my business card; it is my business, and that is how I began to approach it!

Writing a book is a very large investment of time and resources. But it has been exceptionally rewarding to have written two books now on what I am most passionate about – praise and worship training and development.

WestBow Press authors who’d like to share a 350-600 word experience related to the self-publishing of their books are invited to do so through the Blog Guidelines Page. WestBow Press reserves the right to edit stories for content, grammar, punctuation, and length.


Journey to Self-Publishing

In this space, WestBow Press publishes articles written by our authors in which they share some aspect of their self-publishing journey. The following blog is from Bryan Deavor, author of “A Lamp to My Feet.” For more information on the author visit his Facebook. To begin your self-publishing journey, get a free WestBow Press publishing guide today.

The Journey

After diligently seeking God for four years, in 2016 the Lord laid it upon my heart to write and share His word with others. At first, my response was, “Uhh, are you sure you want me to write?!” Not in a million years would I have ever thought of writing, let alone think of trying to get a book published for others to read. Why would I, a nobody, be one called by God to write Christian books? The Lord has His ways of working in our lives, and I’m glad I heeded my calling. Not only was it revealed to me what to write about, I also received the inclination of future books to write as well.

Growing Closer to Him

While I was in the process of writing my first book, I felt excitement, joy, and peace. I knew that it was only because of God, that I was able to feel such a way for pursuing the journey He called me to walk. This was the way forward for me to step into my role of discipleship. Not only did I find my enjoyment during my journey with God on this project, but I grew much closer to Him. My relationship with Him grew to a deeper level of intimacy. He is my Father, and as such, He has my heart.

Once I had completed the first project, I had submitted the works to my editors. I started to feel that my works were not worthy of being published in the public eye. I began feeling that what I just accomplished would have no positive impact for our King and His kingdom. However, my editing team helped me to realize that the work I did was a good start for God and heaven. They helped me understand that the negative perceptions in my head were attacks brought forth by the devil himself. After understanding that, I knew I had to press on and move the book to a publishing company if I wanted to complete the good works on behalf of our Creator.

Searching for the Right Publisher

When I was researching self-publishing companies, I had narrowed down my list to three candidates. After much time praying and considering my options, I had placed calls with each company. Not only did I get to know a little more about each company, each company had their perks. It was WestBow Press that stood out from the bunch and laid heavily on my heart to proceed with. I felt that trying to reach out with my first ever book, a Christian piece of work at that, I needed the backing of a strong Christian publishing company.

Publishing with WestBow Press

After deciding to publish with WestBow Press, it was quick and easy to start the process. The whole team did great work on the project and their design staff exceeded my expectations for the book. From start to finish, sending the book live, was a breeze. The team made every step of the publishing process very easy for me. Each representative for the different phases was professional and courteous. WestBow Press was and is the best fit for my book. I could not be any happier with the results. I look forward to working with the WestBow Press publishing team on my writing endeavors in the near future.

WestBow Press authors who’d like to share a 350-600 word experience related to the self-publishing of their books are invited to do so through the Blog Guidelines Page. WestBow Press reserves the right to edit stories for content, grammar, punctuation, and length.


We Are Not Alone

In this space, WestBow Press publishes articles written by our authors in which they share some aspect of their self-publishing journey. The following blog is from Mistie House, author of “The Father’s Princess.” For more information on the author visit her website and Facebook page. To begin your self-publishing journey, get a free WestBow Press publishing guide today.

Letting Go of an Orphan Spirit

Our greatest desire is Love. This is something that all of us search for. We aspire to feel wanted, accepted, valued and cared for. We are each born with an orphan spirit that yearns to obtain these deepest needs and desires of the heart. This orphan spirit suggests that we are alone, unwanted, abandoned, unloved, and Fatherless. Many of us turn to earthly sources as a means to fill this emptiness in our souls, only to discover further depletion of our self-worth. So where do we turn when the well runs dry?
The Good News is that we do not have to live our lives this way. We can abandon our orphan mentality and grab hold of Love itself. Jesus is the wellspring of Life promising to uphold us for all eternity!

I will not leave you as orphans; I will come to you.
John 14:18

Taking Hold of the Father’s Hand

We have a Heavenly Father that is reaching out to us from above. He longs for us to look up at Him and take hold of His hand in faith, obedience, and trust. He invites us to receive Him as our loving Father and Savior, bringing about our adoption into sonship. Upon this exchange, we are transformed as we learn to let go of our pasts, brokenness, emptiness, and shame, and take hold of our true identity, purpose, and inheritance as sons and daughters of the King of Kings and Lord of Lords. Discovering this Truth changes the course of our lives and sets us on a path of freedom, peace, and joy as we follow Jesus towards the promise of a blessed life.

For those who are led by the Spirit of God are the children of God.
Romans 8:14

WestBow Press Is Leading the Children of God

We are not called to live alone as orphans. We are called to live in His Kingdom and walk with God as His children whom He has adopted and loved. We are then to share the love of our Father with others, inviting them to receive this inheritance for themselves. This is who we are as Children of God- followers of Jesus called to share His message of the good news with the world.

WestBow Press is helping me become the child of God I was created to be, by developing an opportunity to send out my personal invitation of The Father’s Love to others. It has opened a pathway for many people to hear my story, and to receive His message of Love.

On my own, my message would not have traveled far, but with the guidance of my Father’s hand, and the reach of WestBow Press, my message is making its pilgrimage across the world.

WestBow is an extension of the Lord’s hand reaching out to God’s children in the wilderness and leading them throughout their publishing journey. WestBow Press offers the assurance that we, as messengers of Christ, are not compelled to walk alone. The good news is that we have the privilege of turning towards WestBow Press, taking hold of its commitment to become our faithful guide, and trusting in its ability to direct us throughout this adventure.
Personally, I am so thankful for WestBow Press and all they have done to help lead the children of God towards reaching their promised potential in the land of writing.

For I am the LORD your God
who takes hold of your right hand
and says to you, Do not fear;
I will help you.
Isaiah 41:13

 

WestBow Press authors who’d like to share a 350-600 word experience related to the self-publishing of their books are invited to do so through the Blog Guidelines Page. WestBow Press reserves the right to edit stories for content, grammar, punctuation, and length.


Given Up

In this space, WestBow Press publishes articles written by our authors in which they share some aspect of their self-publishing journey. The following blog is from Mary Sharon Bailey, author of “Given Up.” For more information on the author visit her website. To begin your self-publishing journey, get a free WestBow Press publishing guide today.

My Story

Given Up is an autobiographical account of my adoption at the age of 6 weeks and then the search for and finding my birth family when I was 30. I am now 69 and knew that it was the time to get my story in print because of the fact that there is just so much in the media these days concerning adoption and finds.

Many people who have read the book have been extremely encouraged by stating that it was a book that they could not put down until finished. As it is a quick read of only 135 pages, it is good that to be able to read the whole story in one sitting in order to keep it flowing well. Otherwise, some might have the need to re-read some parts to understand the whole process of my search again.

Spreading My Story

As the author of the book Given Up, I have been on quite the journey of talking and book signing at different events. As my book is classified as Christian, I have been doing many talks in church within a 200-kilometer radius of my home. I set up all of the talks myself by doing cold calls to churches and also libraries. As the Christmas season of 2017 ended, I reflected on all of the craft shows that I signed up for and attended also. I have discovered that in order to sell my book, I need to personally be out in the public constantly advertising my book. A very big task that any self-publishing author needs to be aware of if they wish to have their book go worldwide such as what I have intended regarding my book from the start.

If there is anyone reading this blog that may have some questions, I would be more than happy to answer what I can. My domain page concerning the book is www.msharonbailey.com if there is interest to learn more.

WestBow Press authors who’d like to share a 350-600 word experience related to the self-publishing of their books are invited to do so through the Blog Guidelines Page. WestBow Press reserves the right to edit stories for content, grammar, punctuation, and length.


Self-Publishing Lessons I Learned

In this space, WestBow Press publishes articles written by our authors in which they share some aspect of their self-publishing journey. The following blog is from Jack Manilla, author of “Secrets of the Pink House For more information on the author visit his website and Facebook. To begin your self-publishing journey, get a free WestBow Press publishing guide today.

Self-Publishing Newbie

When it comes to running a successful business, I know what it takes. I have worked at many well-established companies including two Fortune 500 companies. But when it came time to publish my personal story in “Secrets Of The Pink House,” I didn’t know what that entailed. At first, I thought getting my book published would be a quick process, taking just a few months to set up the presses; but the truth is, writing and then getting your book published is a very long journey. If you want it done right, it requires patience and expertise.

The publishing team at WestBow are some of the best at what they do. We went through a very detailed process to ensure we were developing a high-quality book, and they were with me every step of the way.  The experience taught me that those considering publishing a book, especially their own personal story, should take into consideration the time and effort it will take to complete. It can be rather daunting, so they should factor that into their decision to publish or not.

Writing a Book is Like Running a Business

“Secrets Of The Pink House,” was indeed a labor of love. After being encouraged for many years to turn my story into a book, and share the lessons I learned while going through some of the roughest patches of my life, I decided to accept the challenge of putting my experiences down on paper.

Writing a book is like running a business; you have to spend serious time working on it every day for it to be successful. Not just a few minutes here and there, you have to invest at least one to four hours of time daily to make it successful and to wind up with a finished product exactly as you envision it. As with everything you do, the effort you invest determines the quality of your finished product.  If writing is not something you are truly passionate about, and you consider it more of a hobby, then taking up the challenge to write a book may not be for you.

Another thing I learned while on this journey was the importance of knowing yourself.  It is critical to stay authentic when writing your story. No one knows you or your story better than you.

Don’t Hesitate to Ask for Help

Lastly, just like when you were in school, don’t hesitate to ask for help. Reach out to your publisher, family and friends, people you trust and invite them to provide you with their opinion and feedback or bounce ideas off of them. They may help you remember a key piece of information or paint a better perspective of a moment or event.

Remember, you may be an expert on your life’s journey, but there are great benefits to bringing in others and learning from their experience like WestBow, to help you achieve the goals you hope to reach when publishing your book.

At the end of the day, I hope that those who pick up a copy of my book learn that through faith, trust and hard work, they are able to succeed in whatever path God places in front of them, and that might just include writing their own story down to share with the world.

WestBow Press authors who’d like to share a 350-600 word experience related to the self-publishing of their books are invited to do so through the Blog Guidelines Page. WestBow Press reserves the right to edit stories for content, grammar, punctuation, and length.


Overcoming My Fear of the Publishing Process

In this space, WestBow Press publishes articles written by our authors in which they share some aspect of their self-publishing journey. The following blog is from Patricia Wasylyna, author of “When Christmas Hurts. For more information on the author visit her website. To begin your self-publishing journey, get a free WestBow Press publishing guide today.

Finding the Inspiration

The inspiration for my book came from my own personal struggle with navigating the holidays in the midst of loss, relationship challenges, the stress of expectations, and general holiday stress. It led me to share my journey through those times and the hope I have discovered in the process. I know I am not alone in my struggle. My hope is to reach those who share similar challenges and emotions. I want to provide hope and a renewed joy for the Christmas season.

Finding My Way with WestBow

Once the book was written, I felt stuck and unable to move forward.  due to my lack of knowledge about the entire publishing process. Thankfully, I discovered Westbow Press through a fellow author. Westbow has helped me every step of the way. They have been very gracious to address and answer my naive questions and concerns. I felt very supported by them at every turn in the process. They made this publishing journey so easy and provided the feedback and help I needed to complete the process.

I have been very pleased with the finished product of my book. They did a fantastic job and helped to create a book that I hope will reach many and provide healing and hope.

WestBow Press authors who’d like to share a 350-600 word experience related to the self-publishing of their books are invited to do so through the Blog Guidelines Page. WestBow Press reserves the right to edit stories for content, grammar, punctuation, and length.


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